transitmaps
transitmaps:

Jenni Sparks does her meticulously-detailed-yet-organic illustration thing with San Francisco (we’ve previously featured her great NYC map), with BART and Caltrain (really?) given strong visual prominence. Strangely, there’s not a single Muni Metro train, F Line streetcar or cable car to be seen!
99percentinvisible:

A beautiful, detailed, hand-drawn map of San Francisco


Great map! I’m a little thrown off by the placement of some of the landmarks and neighborhoods, but it’d be really hard to be exact with a map like this.   I’ve been staring at it for almost an hour now! Too bad the print is $160.

transitmaps:

Jenni Sparks does her meticulously-detailed-yet-organic illustration thing with San Francisco (we’ve previously featured her great NYC map), with BART and Caltrain (really?) given strong visual prominence. Strangely, there’s not a single Muni Metro train, F Line streetcar or cable car to be seen!

99percentinvisible:

A beautiful, detailed, hand-drawn map of San Francisco

Great map! I’m a little thrown off by the placement of some of the landmarks and neighborhoods, but it’d be really hard to be exact with a map like this.   I’ve been staring at it for almost an hour now! Too bad the print is $160.

transitmaps
transitmaps:

Photo: Tactile Muni Metro Map, San Francisco
Maps in underground stations on the Muni light rail network in San Francisco have raised route designation letters and route lines, as well as braille labels for station names. Nice!
I know that it’s entirely happenstance*, but I really appreciate the fact that the M, K, and T lines appear next to each other on the map, making an “MKT” for Market Street.
*Historical aside: Muni streetcar letters were originally assigned alphabetically in the order they came into being, all the way from A to N. Letters then disappeared as many of the old streetcar lines were converted to numerical bus routes, leaving us with the strange assortment of letters we have now. The modern T Line breaks from this naming convention, as it simply refers to the road it mostly runs along, Third Street.
Source: jdaisy/Flickr

"K" and "T" lines are probably so close together because they are one and the same. Only difference is that after Embarcadero the "K" line turns into the "T" and goes down 3rd St.  I’m not sure how many trains only do the "K" route and the "T" route. 

transitmaps:

Photo: Tactile Muni Metro Map, San Francisco

Maps in underground stations on the Muni light rail network in San Francisco have raised route designation letters and route lines, as well as braille labels for station names. Nice!

I know that it’s entirely happenstance*, but I really appreciate the fact that the M, K, and T lines appear next to each other on the map, making an “MKT” for Market Street.

*Historical aside: Muni streetcar letters were originally assigned alphabetically in the order they came into being, all the way from A to N. Letters then disappeared as many of the old streetcar lines were converted to numerical bus routes, leaving us with the strange assortment of letters we have now. The modern T Line breaks from this naming convention, as it simply refers to the road it mostly runs along, Third Street.

Source: jdaisy/Flickr

"K" and "T" lines are probably so close together because they are one and the same. Only difference is that after Embarcadero the "K" line turns into the "T" and goes down 3rd St.  I’m not sure how many trains only do the "K" route and the "T" route. 

maptacular
maptacular:

The Future Is Off The Map

With new location technologies from Foursquare, Apple, and others, we don’t really know where we’re going. Are we okay with that?
“
In San Francisco International Airport’s Terminal 2, there’s a display of old maps of the city. I’m a fiend for antiquarian maps, and I love my city, so I can’t help but linger over David Rumsey’s amazing collection as I pass through. Before I make myself a tiny dot on a transcontinental flight tracker, I long to ground myself by studying the place where I live.
I can’t help wondering, though, if maps are not themselves a piece of history.”
see more at ReadWrite.com

Cartography is beginning to suffer the same fate as photography.

maptacular:

The Future Is Off The Map

With new location technologies from Foursquare, Apple, and others, we don’t really know where we’re going. Are we okay with that?

In San Francisco International Airport’s Terminal 2, there’s a display of old maps of the city. I’m a fiend for antiquarian maps, and I love my city, so I can’t help but linger over David Rumsey’s amazing collection as I pass through. Before I make myself a tiny dot on a transcontinental flight tracker, I long to ground myself by studying the place where I live.

I can’t help wondering, though, if maps are not themselves a piece of history.”

see more at ReadWrite.com

Cartography is beginning to suffer the same fate as photography.